Monday, October 15, 2018

Bill Coors Dies at 102

The former chairman of Coors Brewing Company passed away this weekend.
Bill Coors, a pioneer in the American brewing industry and former chairman of the Adolph Coors Company, died peacefully at his home Saturday at 102.

Molson Coors confirmed his passing in a statement published Saturday.

Bill Coors began working for his grandfather Adolph's brewing company in 1939. Twenty years later, he became company chairman, during which he created and developed the aluminum can, a key milestone for the beer industry.

Despite a lot of skepticism at the time, the aluminum can contributed greatly to the expansion of the craft beer movement, especially in recent years. They are lightweight and preserve the flavor of the beer much better than glass bottles. But, the bigger part of the story is that Bill Coors lived to 102.

Maybe I need to drink more Coors.


See "Beer giant Bill Coors dies at 102" for more.

5 comments:

  1. 102 is a fine number of years to drink beer, even if it's Coors.

    I'm still having to force myself to buy cans. Which is dumb, because it always gets poured into a glass no matter whether it comes from bottle or can.

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  2. I tend to gravitate to craft beer in cans if available. The beer stays fresh longer, they are lighter for travel, and pack in a cooler more securely.

    I remember when my family travelled to St. Louis each year for vacation to visit family, my father would always bring back a case of Coors since he couldn't get in the East.

    Cheers!

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    Replies
    1. Being a native of the Rocky Mountain region, I've was amazed when I was a kid that people form the East would do that.

      Coors was regarded as a "light beer" here, before light beer was popular, and I've never liked it. If its super hot, and you were mowing the lawn, or working cattle, or something, it was good, but that's about it. In the summer, which was the only time of year my father ever bought beer, he never bought Coors and I've never developed a taste for it. An uncle of mine, however, was a huge Coors fan and always had it on hand.

      Recently Coors put out a beer called Batch 19 which was based on a recipe they relocated which supposedly reflects their brew in 1919 just before the Volstead Act was passed. It's really good. I've really wondered why they didn't put that recipe back into production rather than the one they did.

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  3. It's odd to think that Bill Coors was born before the Volstead Act had been passed.

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    Replies
    1. History in the US actually quite short.

      Cheers!

      Delete

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